© A R Beer,2001 Return to Home page

Greenspace Management in Denmark and Sweden

Summary

The Danish experience

The Swedish experience

Regenerating greenspace in and near high density multi storey housing -
Case Studies

DENMARK
Aedalsparken
Gillesager
Hvidovre
Lyngby - Town Green
Mortenshupvej
Taestrup

 

SWEDEN
Alingsås
Angered
Bergsjön
Eriksbo
Gårdsten
Lomma  
Malmo-Holma
Malmo Bo01
Östra Uggledal

-------------------------------

 

Greenspace Management in Denmark and Sweden

Summary

The Danish experience

The Swedish experience

Regenerating greenspace in and near high density multi storey housing -
Case Studies

DENMARK
Aedalsparken
Gillesager
Hvidovre
Lyngby - Town Green
Mortenshupvej
Taestrup

 

SWEDEN
Alingsås
Angered
Bergsjön
Eriksbo
Gårdsten
Lomma  
Malmo-Holma
Malmo Bo01
Östra Uggledal

-------------------------------

 

Greenspace Management in Denmark and Sweden

Summary

The Danish experience

The Swedish experience

Regenerating greenspace in and near high density multi storey housing -
Case Studies

DENMARK
Aedalsparken
Gillesager
Hvidovre
Lyngby - Town Green
Mortenshupvej
Taestrup

 

SWEDEN
Alingsås
Angered
Bergsjön
Eriksbo
Gårdsten
Lomma  
Malmo-Holma
Malmo Bo01
Östra Uggledal

-------------------------------

Innovative solutions to the design, management and maintenance of urban greenspace

 Gårdsten, Gothenburg
Example of the residents being involved in maintenance of the flats and surrounding areas through representation on the Board and of the residents' involvement in running greenhouses attached to their blocks.

This is a large social housing development of approximately 10,000 inhabitants, up to 90% of whom are immigrants. It was first built in the late 1960s/early 1970s as a "top down" development (i.e. no input from the residents). Large blocks of flats were built on two levels on flattened land, which actually created a wind tunnel effect between blocks.

Recent innovative features: The residents are now involved in maintenance of the flats and surrounding areas through representation of selected tenants on the Board. Extra funding has been put into the improvement and renovation of housing and greenspace as a pilot project. Some blocks have been knocked down and others restored. Notable improvements have been made to the outside of the buildings to create a better image.

These are the blocks before renovation and their surrounding greenspaces.

The single most remarkable feature of 2 of these blocks is a large greenhouse that has been created from common ground floor space and projected out into what was communal greenspace. This is accessible from each flat in the block. Facilities include a compost maker in the entry area in front of the greenhouse, a communal laundry, a play area, cycle room and room for waste products that cannot be put in the waste recycling bins. The architect involved in the creation of the greenhouses was also involved in the earlier development of this type of housing.

The photograph below shows how successful this scheme is - it is run by the people living in the block and they are already growing a wide range of plants throughout the year. The new solar panels on the roofs of the blocks add additional heating for the greenhouse as well as the flats, when that is necessary. At other times the power flows into the grid and reduces electricity costs. Every unit now has a balcony which is enclosed for those tenants that have requested it - the windows slide.

Other visible improvements include wooden railings around ground floor flats; improved play areas; sculptures; open space areas and a boules park. The top storey flats (3/6 storey) now have a terrace.

Waste disposal is separated out at block level into newspapers, cardboard, metal, coloured glass, white glass, plastic and batteries. The "producers" are responsible for collecting these materials, as part of a Swedish national system.

 

The solar panel system can be seen on the rooftop above. The courtyards between the buildings are fairly open and allow for meeting places with lots of seats, as well as having small children's play features within them. Some of the original trees have been retained and these are a great advantage, providing shade when necessary and doing a little to reduce wind speed.

The above solution for marking out an individual garden for the ground floor unit has been done at the tenant's request - it remains to be seen whether the right plant material was used or the right level of maintenance will be provided. 

A lot of the immigrant residents would like to start up small businesses on site, but current planning laws prevent such initiatives. There is a local shop, formerly one of the large ICA supermarket chain. The big shops do not want to be sited in this area, which is a problem for the many low income families living here.

Training in greenspace maintenance for local people
The local housing company in Gårdsten runs a training-course for green open space workers. The course is principally intended for the unemployed people in the area. Furthermore the housing company have developed a policy thas says that all maintenence being done in- and outdoors should be done by contractors the majority of whose employees live in the area. The idea is to keep the money in the area.

 

 

Solhuset
(by the same architect who designed the greenhouse schemes in the regenerated area)

This is an energy project developed by a private architect in a different part of Gothenburg. The pilot involves just one 3/4 storey block, with 2-3 staircases and 2 flats in each storey. The block has double walls and solar collectors on the roof. A greenhouse has been provided for the tenants and it has become a very important social feature. People started by growing plants in the greenhouse and then they wanted to grow them outside too, so they started to look after allotments on a voluntary basis. The housing company has not yet repeated this project elsewhere. The same architect is involved, as for the Gårdsten initiative.

 

© Anne Beer, 2001

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Latest update : 20 Sept 2001