© A R Beer,2001 Return to Home page

Greenspace Management in Denmark and Sweden

Summary

The Danish experience

The Swedish experience

Regenerating greenspace in and near high density multi storey housing -
Case Studies

DENMARK
Aedalsparken
Gillesager
Hvidovre
Lyngby - Town Green
Mortenshupvej
Taestrup

 

SWEDEN
Alingsås
Angered
Bergsjön
Eriksbo
Gårdsten
Lomma  
Malmo-Holma
Malmo Bo01
Östra Uggledal

-------------------------------

 

Greenspace Management in Denmark and Sweden

Summary

The Danish experience

The Swedish experience

Regenerating greenspace in and near high density multi storey housing -
Case Studies

DENMARK
Aedalsparken
Gillesager
Hvidovre
Lyngby - Town Green
Mortenshupvej
Taestrup

 

SWEDEN
Alingsås
Angered
Bergsjön
Eriksbo
Gårdsten
Lomma  
Malmo-Holma
Malmo Bo01
Östra Uggledal

-------------------------------

 

Greenspace Management in Denmark and Sweden

Summary

The Danish experience

The Swedish experience

Regenerating greenspace in and near high density multi storey housing -
Case Studies

DENMARK
Aedalsparken
Gillesager
Hvidovre
Lyngby - Town Green
Mortenshupvej
Taestrup

 

SWEDEN
Alingsås
Angered
Bergsjön
Eriksbo
Gårdsten
Lomma  
Malmo-Holma
Malmo Bo01
Östra Uggledal

-------------------------------

Innovative solutions to the design, management and maintenance of urban greenspace

Eriksbo, Gothenburg
Example of resident action, successfully turning round a deteriorating housing estate. The changed role of the housing company and the formation of a voluntary co-operative association.

10-15 years ago the residents of this housing estate, which dates back to the 1970s, formed a voluntary co-operative association with the aim of improving local facilities and community activities. Members could be active or passive (putting in funds but not doing things themselves). Activities were not confined to landscape/green issues.

They wanted allotments and to design and maintain garden areas; they wanted to take over the school and maintain its high standards. The chief executive of the city-owned housing company showed vision in involving the residents in discussions about what they wanted in terms of housing. It has become such a successful project that the housing estate is no longer regarded as a poor area to live in. Close co-operation between the municipal administration (SDF) and the local association, which is not typical of other housing developments, is reflected in the presence of offices of both organisations in Träffpunkt, the communal café building. There is a huge social programme available; new residents are given a publication, Välkommen till Eriksbo, which details all the amenities and societies on offer. A local newspaper is produced regularly.

 

The above courtyard has been turned by the residents into a kindergarten - the downstairs floor of the flats has been converted into the school room.

 

Private gardens have expanded out into the communal greenspace - something that is welcomed, as it reduces the workload for the community's caretakers. The voluntary association has gradually taken over responsibility from the housing company for maintenance of the greenspace. The association receives the funds that the housing company would otherwise use to hire workers and it now employs 6 workers for gardening and maintenance (2 women and 4 men, including 4 immigrants), who would otherwise be unemployed. This system works very well, as all the residents are aware of who is working for them and can talk to the caretakers about what needs doing. Alternatively people with an idea or complaint can go the the community meeting centre on the estate and talk to someone who can react instantly to the problem.

Amenities include a small church and a meeting room, which also acts as an office for those working on and co-ordinating the improvements at Eriksbo.

The adjacent parkland has also engaged the attention of the Eriksbo residents and a committee exists to manage the Children's Farm and work on it and the parkland and play facilities - local people put in many hours of voluntary work.

2 workers are paid by the voluntary association to maintain a children's farm; a beehive surrounded by a small fenced garden is also on site.

 

© Anne Beer, 2001

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Latest update : 2 Oct 2001