© A R Beer,2001 Return to Home page

Greenspace Management in Denmark and Sweden

Summary

The Danish experience

The Swedish experience

Regenerating greenspace in and near high density multi storey housing -
Case Studies

DENMARK
Aedalsparken
Gillesager
Hvidovre
Lyngby - Town Green
Mortenshupvej
Taestrup

 

SWEDEN
Alingsås
Angered
Bergsjön
Eriksbo
Gårdsten
Lomma  
Malmo-Holma
Malmo Bo01
Östra Uggledal

-------------------------------

 

Greenspace Management in Denmark and Sweden

Summary

The Danish experience

The Swedish experience

Regenerating greenspace in and near high density multi storey housing -
Case Studies

DENMARK
Aedalsparken
Gillesager
Hvidovre
Lyngby - Town Green
Mortenshupvej
Taestrup

 

SWEDEN
Alingsås
Angered
Bergsjön
Eriksbo
Gårdsten
Lomma  
Malmo-Holma
Malmo Bo01
Östra Uggledal

-------------------------------

 

Greenspace Management in Denmark and Sweden

Summary

The Danish experience

The Swedish experience

Regenerating greenspace in and near high density multi storey housing -
Case Studies

DENMARK
Aedalsparken
Gillesager
Hvidovre
Lyngby - Town Green
Mortenshupvej
Taestrup

 

SWEDEN
Alingsås
Angered
Bergsjön
Eriksbo
Gårdsten
Lomma  
Malmo-Holma
Malmo Bo01
Östra Uggledal

-------------------------------

Greenspace Management in Denmark and Sweden

Summary

The Danish experience

The Swedish experience

Regenerating greenspace in and near high density multi storey housing -
Case Studies

DENMARK
Aedalsparken
Gillesager
Hvidovre
Lyngby - Town Green
Mortenshupvej
Taestrup

 

SWEDEN
Alingsås
Angered
Bergsjön
Eriksbo
Gårdsten
Lomma  
Malmo-Holma
Malmo Bo01
Östra Uggledal

-------------------------------

 

Greenspace Management in Denmark and Sweden

Summary

The Danish experience

The Swedish experience

Regenerating greenspace in and near high density multi storey housing -
Case Studies

DENMARK
Aedalsparken
Gillesager
Hvidovre
Lyngby - Town Green
Mortenshupvej
Taestrup

 

SWEDEN
Alingsås
Angered
Bergsjön
Eriksbo
Gårdsten
Lomma  
Malmo-Holma
Malmo Bo01
Östra Uggledal

-------------------------------

 

Innovative solutions to the design, management and maintenance of urban greenspace

Lyngby
Example of the conventional top down approach to greenspace management in a small town where the maintenance is still done by city employees

Lyngby is a small town to the north of Copenhagen. Many inhabitants commute to the city for work. It is an important regional shopping centre. Originally a small village with important estates in the vicinity, the town has grown steadily since the 1950s, with many relatively low density, low rise housing areas. The town has always prided itself on the quality and quantity of its greenspaces which have been linked together to form corridors through the town. The aim here is only to give an overall impression of how this town manages its greenspaces.

1. Maintenance of greenspace in Lyngby

The municipality has had plans for the maintenance of greenspace going back 20 years. Initially management was in the hands of caretakers and a scheme was devised to demonstrate the expenditure and efficiency of such management to the politicians. 4 levels of maintenance were available, for example, grass could be mown at intervals according to an agreed scale of expenditure, but unmown grass proved to be unpopular and this scheme was not pursued.

Today the maintenance of public greenspace, including cemeteries but excluding greenspace around housing areas and excluding the deer park, is organised by teams of 125 skilled gardeners, one third of whom also act in a supervisory capacity. There are very few private enterprises involved in this maintenance work.

[ARB has requested information on the total area of land involved and the population involved.]

There are currently 600 allotments in Lyngby for a population of 56,000. A law has recently been passed to protect and preserve existing allotments.

Other than the care of allotments, there is no real tradition of residents looking after their own communal green areas.

2. Budget allocations

As a guide, in 2000 a total of 30 million DKr. were spent on green areas and cemeteries in Lyngby (just Lyngby urban area), with an income of 4 million DKr. from use of the land by sports teams, etc.

These figures were provided by the Parks Department, Lyngby-Taarbaek Kommune.

[Table to be checked - figures incomplete and don't tally with total of 30 m.]

Costings do not currently include an assessment of administrative staff time, but new projects, for example, on kindergarten playgrounds or road schemes now have to include a record of time spent by administrative staff.

More recent budgeting exercises include the costing of caring for the upkeep of a small graveyard. This exercise is not aimed at cutting costs, but in enabling the team of gardeners involved to prioritise their work and take on more responsibility for the allocation of their duties. The Parks Department continues to control the budget and make the financial decisions. However, if this pilot proves successful, then it will be adopted more widely as a control mechanism and a means of providing feedback to politicians on the distribution of funds.

3. Involvement of inhabitants in greenspace issues

The creation of a small park, Gosvej, was given as an example of the involvement of local residents in a greenspace project. A design was drawn up for the park and then local people were involved in taking the design forward - they wanted a football pitch and they got it.

The local pond was improved with the help of the inhabitants. Most of the pond is surrounded by dense vegetation, to stop young children falling in and also because it is good for wildlife.

A large play area was built in the corner of the field and is well used by children on their own and by mothers bringing their children. Parents, children and teachers are always involved in design schemes for school playgrounds.

This footpath is very informal and was designed by the local people to give access to their back gardens - the grass is only cut a few times a year here

A People's Park has been created, consisting of 10 gardens within a public park, which are managed and maintained by local people.

10 years ago a Nature Gardens project was begun. It was decided to create four types of green within each park: a flower park, a nature park, a "normal" park and a forest area. Existing funds were used but in a different way than previously - it was found that 80% of the funds involved were used in the past only for cutting grass. The result is a small area of beautiful flower gardens in each park, with the rest maintained at a lower level of intensity. The level of biodiversity in the town has been increased over the decade.

This park has been broken down onto complex and therefore interesting shapes - the well wooded area on the left of this picture has been allowed to go wild, while the path edge is either low shrubs or neatly mown grass (the areas for frequent mowing now form only a small part of the park). Despite these changes, the park still has the feel of a town park, not a wilderness.

 

(Additional information to be added from Ton Plan when translated.)

 

© Anne Beer, 2001

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Latest update : 20 Sept 2001